About your Search

20121101
20121130
SHOW
STATION
CSPAN 64
CSPAN2 3
LANGUAGE
English 67
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 67
as he tribesmen another see the u.s., for instance you would see them as an al qaeda member. the u.s. thinks it's killing an al qaeda member and maybe it is. but he's been a killed on the ground and yemenis seen being killed is in fact the tribesman. this is a challenge that the u.s. obama administration not released all and i would argue that the drones in the airstrikes have not actually solve the problem and they've actually exacerbated the problem the great deal. so not to go on too long, but just let me close with this last scenario. after the christmas day attack 2009, president obama asked his staff to imagine what would happen if al qaeda had been successful and i think that's a very good exercise. and if today al qaeda were able to carry out an attack, even a fairly small one not on the scale of september 11th, but on the scale of christmas day 2009, with the u.s. respond? many people, put myself into a large-scale renovation of yemen would be mistaken that the u.s. has been bombing them and for the past three years and it really doesn't seem to have had the impact of the u.
of their force projection in the persian gulf into that conflict. i think there is hope that the u.s.-israel relationship is strong and open enough and the lines of communication are open up that it would not happen. one of the other things that if it may give a little positivity towards that is a concern that the nuclear facilities are so far in the ground that israel does not producing a satisfactory assault. they would need u.s. plant emissions to carry some of those weapons. perhaps that might give some hope there would be communication, if there is an attack down the line, that the two countries would be to work together and cordray. host: 3 more, go to foreignpolicy.com. thank you for talking to our viewers. guest: thank you for having me. host: that does it for today. we will be back live tomorrow morning but lawmakers make their way back for the lame-duck session that begins today. we will be up there taking your calls and your comments and questions. thank you for watching today. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satel
with five u.s. airlines including alaska, american, delta, united and u.s. airways, we anticipate the t.s.a. precheck will be in 35 airports by the end of the year with b.w.i., san francisco, and orlando airports all coming online this week. an additional airlines will be coming onboard >> all of this briefing in our c-span networks. we'll take you live to the white house for the briefing with jay carney. >> good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. thanks for being here. i have a brief statement to read at the top which is that today the president was able to continue returning messages of congratulations from his counterparts around the world. each call he thadged his counterpart for their friend -- thanked his counterpart for their friendship and expressed his desire for close cooperation moving ahead. the president spoke with president karzai of afghanistan, the prime minister of italy, the king of joshedian -- jordan, qatar, president putin of russia, and the president of spain. with that i'll take your questions. >> a couple questions about the scandal that many of us are now covering
performed by national captioning institute] >> the u.s. house gavels in to begin their first bit of legislative work starting the lame duck session, four bills including on asthma inhalers and gavel back out when they finish to return for votes at 6:30 and we expect them to swear in a number of members filling out the remainder of terms for the 112th congress. we expect those to happen during the upcoming votes at 6:30 this evening. the senate also in session today and they have been dealing with a bill drk working on rules to federal land to federal hunting and fishing and the house and senate committees getting under way this week. the intelligence committees in particular off the floor, the intelligence committee of the senate and the house will be meeting in closed session to look at the attack in libya in benghazi this week. tomorrow on c-span 3, we will be covering a hearing looking at the meningitis outbreak. that is tomorrow morning at 10:00 eastern, c-span 3. the president will be hosting a news conference. we do not know the time of the news conference yet. this will be
commander, jewish war veterans of the u.s.a. charles sasino jr., national commander, american ex-prisoners of war. leo haley, national commander, catholic war veterans of the u.s.a. william meeks, secretary, vietnam veterans of america. john hamilton, commander in chief, veterans of foreign wars of the united states. cleve gear, national commander aamvets. samuel hunt, national president, blinded veterans association. john cahill, national commander, army and navy union of the u.s.a. h. gene overstreet, national commander, noncommissioned officers. james kutz, national commander, the american legion. bruce mckenty, national commander, military order of the purple heart of the u.s.a. mark kilgore, national president, fleet reserve association. james tuey, national commandant, marine corps league. edward brogan, national president military chaplin association. bill lawson, national president, paralyzed veterans of america. benny atkins, national commander, legion of valor of the u.s.a. gary angen, commander in chief, military order of the world wars. jack clemp, president, national
clear yesterday that he is open to new ideas. the u.s. cannot afford tax cuts that were passed 10 years ago -- over 10 years ago now. he feels that the most fair way to pick our revenue shortfall is by raising revenue from the very top. >> explained to everyone, if you can. under balsams and, it was predicted that we have -- bowl es-simpson, it was predicted that we would have 16 trillion dollars. even if you have that, why is that ok to have 22 trillion dollars of debt at in 10 years? by the is that considered still a good thing to do? -- why is that considered still a good thing to do it? >> the best capacity is the size of the debt relative to the economy. what the president has proposed is to put us on a path where the debt is stabilized and we are coming down relative to gdp. >> it is still 100% of gdp. >> i would explain a little bit about the numbers. that is the 16 trillion dollar figure that you mentioned earlier. i do nothing that is inappropriate way of measuring our debt. it is not the measure of that that is economic relevant. >> ten or 12? >> closer to 12. >> ok. the unemp
and now that is not going to happen. we will still have u.s. troops in afghanistan one year from now two years from now, five years from now. where is the press? obviously, these are not issues that the people who run on these programs today -- >> why not? >> because they do not draw an audience. what draws an audience is charlie sheen. what draws an audience is people yelling at each other. it is not enough to say these issues are important. if we actually -- i know it sounds totally idealistic, but when you and i became journalists as young men, we actually believed that we were entering, really, a special, chosen profession that meant something to a democracy. >> we called it a calling. >> a calling, exactly. >> exactly. word of honor, i never thought i was going to get rich as a journalist. you do not go into journalism to become wealthy. >> the changes we are talking about, you have already touched upon the affect it has on our society, on the business itself. value systems change. i am not saying we can ever return to the good old days. that is done, but what worries me is whether
about where the u.s. didn't -- where the u.s. student -- we never had a conservative actor -- a concerted effort of a ranking system. the report does. it is almost entirely prestige and important. in its judgments as opposed to outcomes. we need to think more about how to deal with this problem. the public university has the system of accountability. but that is not everybody, of course. it's caught some way so we're trying to adjust its. but how to half in place incentives systems to focus on outputs is a big deal. during the brief period of time, i joined with the presidents at columbia and stanford. he understood exactly how distorted that rating system was. but then several days later the people told him how much that issue generated in terms of profits and if he wanted to stay its editor, he better leave it alone. >> here again, the role of the president comes in. he was very disturbed because the u.s. rankings were falling. day asked him to go out and drum up more applicants so the universe would look more selective. he said to them, i'm not going to go to rural areas
there versus the u.s.? caller: i was looking at a place in a number of places in the philippines a friend of mine i'm a veteran and talk to other vets and he has a very nice small apartment right across the street from the beach and it's $150 a month. host: do you get a military pension? caller: no, i don't. i just missed. host: host: we're looking at twitter page. back to our calls in memphis. how is the economy affecting your retirement plans? caller: the economy is affecting my retirement plans. when the -- before the market crashed i had mutual fund and a stock in a couple of different companies. as the economy tanked even more i was one of the people who was without employment. i was able to draw unemployment and so i was able to have that until i received another job which was at a greater pay cut. now at this point trying to go back to school, trying to get my mutual funds back together because i did cash one of them out. my ira is together. i never rolled my 401-k over either. at this point trying to go back to school, trying to live on less money, downgrading all the way, having
. the u.s. is taking a lot of steps right now to right the ship. labor may be one of them. taxation may be one of them. there are some estimates that we can be energy self-sufficient in the next 30, 40 years, so maybe that helps. this is a very complex issue. it has to be resolved. there has to be a happy medium there. whether or not it is because these ceos are boring abroad for certain things or not, that is up for debate. i'm certainly not one who will take a position on that because i don't know enough about it to make that call. there are a lot of very smart people out there, who we should respect, they are very good at what they do and they are still debating about what the proper solutions to this is. all right now, this is why we're seeing such a huge amount of debate going on in d.c. and in board rooms across the country. washington, d.c. host: there have been reports that secretary geithner will play a role in these talks. guest: the economic team is in place right now. this is obviously a very critical role for the administration and for the american people as a whole. with t
and outline the next steps i will take. as background, puerto rico has been a u.s. territory since 1898. the island is home to 3.7 million american citizens who cannot vote for president, are not represented in the senate, and elect a nonvoting member to the house. federal law is supreme in puerto rico but its residents are treated unequally under many federal programs. voters were first asked whether they want puerto rico to remain a territory. over 1.7 million people answered. which is about 75% of registered voters on the island. 54% said they did not want the current status to continue while 46% said they did. voters were then asked to express their preference among the three viable alternatives to the current status. statehood, free association and independence. over 1.3 million people chose an option. 61% voted for statehood. 33% voted for free association. and 5.5% voted for independence. in addition, 472,000 voters did not provide an answer. this marked the first time voters were directly asked whether they want puerto rico to remain a territory. one of the two main political pa
of israel, our ally. the u.s. should be bold in its condemnation of hamas and the u.s. should be bold in this continuing war by terrorist, like hamas, on civilized nations and that's just the way it is. the speaker pro tempore: for what purpose does the gentleman from oregon rise? the gentleman is recognized for one minute. mr. blumenauer: thank you, madam speaker. perhaps one of the best parts of serving in congress is the access to our library, the library of congress, the dedicated staff at c.r.s., the magnificent reading room. the library of congress is a national treasure. and leading the library of congress is dr. james billington. he was a scholar and institutional leader before assuming leadership of the library of congress 25 years ago. as chair of the library of congress caucus, it's been a great pleasure to work with dr. billington and his outstanding staff on a variety of issues and activities for members of congress. the caucus urges you to join speaker boehner today in the rayburn room at 11:00 a.m. as he honors dr. james billington and his exemplary quarter century of l
to train. specialist nelson is just one of 60 -- 60 u.s. service members who have been killed this year by the afghans that they were sent to train. i don't know where the outrage is by the united states congress. i am very disappointed in both parties, their leadership to allow our young men and women to stay in a war that has no end to it, makes no sense to the american people. in fact, mr. speaker, the american people have said time after time, poll after poll that they want to bring our troops home now, not 2014 but now. on october 7, there was a national article written and the title was "a mother mourns a grim milestone," referring to the 2,000 american casualties from the afghan war. lisa freeman, who was interviewed in the article, who lost her son, captain matthew freeman, in 2009, he was shot by a sniper in afghanistan, ms. freeman said, i just sat here reliving the pain and wondering , where is america's outrage? where is america's concern that we're still at war? and mr. speaker, i made reference to this yesterday. the october 14 "new york times" editorial, and the title, "t
lost more than 40% of their wealth from 2007 to 2010. nearly one in six u.s. residents is officially poor, the highest rate in 50 years. 22% of american children live in poverty. we're facing an economic situation that resembles the years leading up to the great depression. now, this prevailing budget plan calls for deep cuts, environmental protection, social security, medicare, medicaid. well, corporations and the top 1% get tax cuts of nearly $3 trillion over the next decade. this is not how you protect a democracy. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman's time has expired. for what purpose does the gentleman from texas seek recognition? mr. poe: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute. the speaker pro tempore: without objection, so ordered. mr. poe: mr. speaker, the -- a president has finally given us his balanced plan to allegedly avoid the fiscal cliff. he wants to raise taxes by $1.6 trillion. he wants another stimulus package of $50 billion. he wants the authority to raise the debt ceiling without asking congress for approval. say it isn't so, mr. speaker.
and democratic attorney general. one of our two u.s. senators was an independent, elected twice. an independent missed winning the governorship by 15,000 votes over a million passed in 1973. we were the ticket splitting capital of america. we have cents settled back into partisan voting with the rest of america. this is a very polarized era. having said that, when you have close elections you still have a band of voters who will mix and match on the ballot, either because they want to mix and match or they are simply reacting to the individual candidates. in the case of romney and kaine, i have personally been in situations where straw votes were taken among large groups and you generally find you have 3, 4, 5% of the romney boaters picking tim kane for various reasons. some of these romney voters are more moderate republicans and the like tim kane better than his opponent. are there similar voters for obama and george allen? i am sure there are. i never met one of them. but i will say this -- george allen, despite what happened in 2006, he has won from time to time in running for statewide off
is a distinguished former advisor -- current advisor to many government agencies, u.s. leaders and diplomats, and he is a prolific and best-selling author. let me quote from the top of his web site at the university of maryland where he is the anwar sadat professor of peace. "i have always believed good scholarship can be relevant and cons consequential for public policy. it is possible to affect public policy without being an advocate. to be passionate about peace without losing analytical power. to be moved by what is just while conceding that no one has a monopoly on justice." i think our other scholars and our world affairs council college shares that sentiment. jinan reed is a associate professor of sociology and health at duke university, she's a carnegie scholar and an associate director. she is half libyan, spent much of her childhood in libya, and thanks to the arab spring she has had a touching and moving reunion with her father after many, many years. i owe you great thanks for a zesty presentation two months ago, and of course, we won't go into it, but i also owe you dinner. professor ma
forcefully placed. so everything looked shiny and fine until the u.s. government -- it was in spring of 1997, through madeline albright made the statement at george mason university, well, it looks like sanctions are -- disarmament is going well. if it goes well we can still not lift the sanctions which was a condition under the security council. sanctions -- so we can't lift the sanctions until saddam hussein is removed. so that came my obsession with the regime change. that, of course, destroyed in the sense the institution and operations. so i think that experience -- could havi annan led the group to see if they can re-establish something similar and this report of which has not been very much observed. i think we have ideas for iran. that will give really intrusive inspections. it will give the right for the international community to go where there is concern. not where iran is declaring. but then to pay for that is to lift the sanctions. and then we can have an outcome. and let the iranian people take care of it. it's not for the outside to do the regime change. >> thank you. we'll ta
, and commitment each of them so courageously demonstrated. i am pleased that the u.s. house of representatives is acting to pass this legislation to name the u.s. office in cocoa in honor of harry t. and harriette moore. passage of house resolution 2338 will further honor the achievements and sacrifices of the moores. leaders and first martyrs of our nation's modern civil rights era. designating the united states post office at 600 florida avenue in cocoa as the harry t. and harriette moore post office will demonstrate their legacy in a town where mr. moore began his service to others. this will serve as a constant reminder to our community of the important and lasting contributions the moores made to cocoa and the nation. i urge my colleagues to join me in passing this legislation. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the chair recognizes mr. clay. mr. clay: mr. speaker, let me thank and congratulate my good friend from florida, there posey, for bringing-mr. posey, for bringing to this house, bringing to our attention these two great americans and legacy they left this country. and thank yo
in the u.s. economy for you? it makes no sense. they go away and compete against us rather than innovating and creating jobs here. then i took a closer look at what the republicans are actually proposing. they haven't turned the corner at all. in fact, they haven't even stepped out of their houses. they certainly didn't learn anything from the last election. the stem visa bill on the house floor this week was actually voted down in september. it was introduced with a few changes and no consultation with democrats. i want to find a bipartisan solution on immigration. i'm committed to it. i know it won't be easy. they say a journey of 1,000 miles begins with just one step. the problem is my colleagues on the other side of the aisle want to take one step and have the democrats travel the other 999.9 miles. certainly this bill isn't even a step it's a shell game. it's the same problem that the stem bill in september had. it holds visa from a legal immigration program that works over to a new visa category where there may or may not be sufficient demand to use those visas each year. immigration
the panel and we'll see you the reception. >> next a look at the changes in the u.s. senate following tuesday elections. then the president obama obama and speaker bainer and then the polling during the 2012 presidential campaign. >> tomorrow president obama will be at arlington national cemetery to participate in the ceremony at the tom of the unknown and a remembrance ceremony. live coverage begins at 11:00 a.m. eastern on c-span. >> 2013 should be the year we solve our debt reform. i'm proposing we avert the fiscal cliff and 2013 is finally the year our government comes to grips with the problems that are facing us. >> i'm open to compromise and new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenge. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i'm not going to ask students and seniors and middle class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me aren't asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> the new elected congress starts in january but the congress has to do work in a lame duck session and they have to work on the federal deficit raising the debt ceil
, see that as a stabilizing function. at the end of the day when you have the capacity as u.s. military for power protection as well. that is a global capability, but that means their respective of choices that are made by other powers, we want the ability to sustain our presence in the asia-pacific, same is true around the globe. as you look at these different areas, i think there are terrific opportunities to engage with china on each of them. and to finally ask the question and try to answer the question the secretary clinton has been encased in for quite some time and that is, can we get a better answer than we physically had in the past to how a new rising power comes into the international system? in other words, can we do so without running significant risks or falling into conflict? >> thank you. >> i agree with everything the undersecretary said. in fact, the admiral locklear _ those points the other day in australia, talking about the engagement in that strategic trust again. it is interesting the chinese tend to look at the american asia-pacific pivot as a sort of containment
in the u.s. senate to pass important legislation, including the grand rudman deficit law. those issues remain important today. he did not aspire to be a politician. he did not have to like one. he cared deeply. we know he cared deeply about our country and devoted himself because he had a calling to shape and preserve our country's future. he believed deeply in the rule of law and used the force of his intellect to defend it. one of the things that is most telling about warren rudman is the statement that represents what he was all about. he once said -- i consider myself an american first and a republican second, fiercely independent, and totally committed to the common good. he had the carriage of his convictions and stood for what he believed in. in bidding farewell to to the senate in 1992, he expressed gratitude for the opportunity to serve in the senate which talented colleagues. many are here today to speak about their experiences with him. he expressed his hopes for the future of the senate, saying it is a special place with special people. i hope in the coming years that the i
with the prime minister. he is making the first visit by a u.s. president to cambodia appeared he went straight from the airport to a meeting with the prime minister that officials described as "ten se." emphasizes concerns about cambodia's human rights situation he is here in washington speaking in about half an hour and 40 minutes at the brookings institution. tonight we're calling to have live coverage for you. ted koppel talks about the future of network news. he is interviewed by marvin. they will touch on the network is caused by the digital age. we have it 8:00 eastern. >> the mindset of the world well into the mid-1990s was that wireline access was stepped on polls are buried in the ground. it was the key to understanding competition. the intriguing part of the wireless story is how very he people inside the industry, but that is why this report cannot the way it did. it was not just judge greene who did not understand the potential of wireless. it was the entire industry. what turned out to be the case was the hope that some people had to ecotage have a robustly competitive, fixed line
enforcement, along with the u.s. customs and border protection, as well as federal and local and foreign law enforcement has created this initiative. the first best initiative was created in laredo back in 2005. and it's become a model across the country. and this is a comprehensive approach to identify, disrupt, dismantle transnational criminal organizations that have posed significant threats to the border and maritime security. through investigations, seize years of contra-- seizures of contraband, they are building success. there are 48 units throughout the united states. they work not only with the mexican counterparts but with the canadian counterparts. certainly we want to make sure that congress provides the best support to the best units in order to enhance border security and of course the communities that we have -- that we all represent. so, again, members, i would ask that you all work and support this bill and today, a very appropriate time, we had the new president-elect of mexico that came down here, met with members of congress and i believe at this particular time he's meet
be honing in on. as well as you know, this year's conference is galvanized around a set of issues u.s. national security, six topic issues for the president in 2013. and let me just recap those for you because we want to drill down in these. the council selected u.s. economic competitiveness, u.s. education competing globally. the middle east, china, afghanistan, pakistan and u.s. energy policy as the six top issues. starting with that. looking at its strategically, do you feel that those are the core issues before president obama and this administration and our country going into 2013? if not, what would you change? what would you add? >> when i was informed by lori murray about the outcome of the process by which the world affairs council went through and came up with those six issues, i thought you had it exactly right. i think those are the big issues and congratulations to you. i think you had them just right. i think there's an overarching issue on top of all of them in some sense enables all of them. and that is if you look at the national security challenges and foreign policy
of the iranian nuclear program and what people assume our u.s. deadlines -- not deadlines. from the u.s. perspective, and it differs from israel's, the u.s. says it cannot accept a situation where iran is capable of crossing the nuclear threshold either secretly or in some way where the u.s. would not be able to react or in a fortified compound. the assumption of some people is that that will happen within the next 12 to 18 months. maybe because of mishaps or deliberately because they do not want to come within that threshold, that will not happen within the next year and a half. if you do not reach an agreement between now and summer, i think it will become more and more difficult to say there is a process, even if iran is not approaching the threshold. and that is where the pressure will build, both from within the u.s. and israel, for the u.s. to do something. i would not say the president has mismanaged this. to some degree, he has. this is a national security issue. the u.s. has put containment off the table. one can argue whether that was a good strategic choice. it is very much o
television provider. >> now, a discussion on the impact of tuesday's election from the u.s. senate. this is about 45 pence. -- this is about 45 minutes. host: ira shapiro is the author of "the last great senate." he is here to talk to was about the issues facing the senate coming up in the next edition of the senate. welcome to the program. guest: is good to be here. host: tell us a bit about the book. the title, the last great senate. what was it about the folks who were in that senate, the class of '62? who were the big guys in that class and what made them part of the last great senate? guest: i said in the book that america had a great senate from the early 1960's through 1980, a group of people who were focused on the national interests and were in the forefront of every issue facing the country. it is the senate of hubert humphrey, howard baker, robert and ted kennedy, robert dole and many others. they were an unusual group and they were triggered, in my estimation, by their war experience, the need for dealing with the cold war, and a progressive impulse that focused on some
tired of your constant criticism of old wealthy white men. i think it is undignified for a u.s. senate candidate. charlie, i'm tired of your gross distortion of truth in regard to angus king come and i'm tired of your tv commercials ruining all my favorite shows on abc. i get it. 1.3 million. we both think that angus is responsible for terrible things. that and everything else. but as a citizen of maine, i ask you stop this for the next hour. i would like to talk about the issues. i pledge to give to check for $5000 each to the main surety of your choice. this is an opportunity to prove that you put maine verse. >> moderator: not know about our candidates, we're going to move into her questions. there are a lot of issues. again, you're free to submit a question of your own that are website or facebook or twitter. one in five americans approve of the job that the congress is doing. it is the lowest approval rating in the reason that most of you are here, mostly because he is tired of the lack of bipartisanship in washington. here's how she describes the problem. >> these are american is
commander in iraq. talking about the changing structure of the u.s. army. that's set to start at about 10:30 eastern here on c-span. just a short while ago, president obama farthered the white house this morning on his way to wisconsin with just a few days until the election, the president is returning to the campaign trail after placing his campaign on hold for the past few days to manage the federal response to hurricane sandy. the president holds a rally in green bay, wisconsin, this morning before heading west for an eempt later today in las vegas. you can watch both those events live on line at c-span.org. tonight at 9:00 eastern, the president will be speaking to supporters at the university of colorado in boulderment you can watch that live right here on c-span. mitt romney is campaigning throughout virginia today. he'll be in roanoke, virginia beach, and this afternoon in doswell just outside richmond. c-span will have live coverage of that stop beginning about 2:15. also live a rally with mitt romney's wife ann. that will be at noon eastern. she's speaking with supporters in colu
the biggest impact in the u.s.? >> one of the most powerful campaigns was the trayvon martin case. a 17-year-old african-american, killed in florida, tragically. two weeks after the incident, there was no media coverage of all. a private injustice. the parents start a petition, and then it goes viral. the importance is not just the individual acts of arresting his killer in prosecuting him, but the public. the result, the awareness of the tragic situation of young african-americans not being treated fairly in the justice system or the "stand your ground" laws, where you can almost impunitively shoot someone. that is some of the really exciting things we see. >> in trayvon martin's case, clearly there was an impact, but they were not waiting. they were in there pretty soon, on the case. what i want to ask you -- do you find a difference in the way that companies -- you have a lot of petitions aimed at companies that do specific things. obviously, some have had more political implications. is there a difference in response between business institutions and political institutions? >> politician
go to the u.s. senate and do exactly what john edwards did, and that will immediately start campaigning to be present. i believe our federal legislators are there to take care of federal business and our state legislatures, to be in our -- federal legislators ought to be down in our state, sending dollars to the state, and not sending them to the federal government to have federal legislators play a large game of twister to get the best position. host: bob cusack? guest: the caller mentioned term limits, and it was something mitt romney embraced, and the republicans on capitol hill have not embraced that, and neither have the democrats. it was talked about in the newt gingrich era, but both republicans and democrats are not fond of term limits. there is an argument against it, and that is when members get here, they promised to term- limit themselves, and when they get here they do not know how to legislate, they do not know where the bathrooms are, and just like anything they get experience and better at it, and they break the term-limit pledge. term limits will be discusse
stronger and better positioned to surpass the u.s. in a critical marketplace of the 21st century global economy. according to the national association of manufacturers, russia imported over $500 billion in goods last year, and of that total only 5% came from u.s. exports. this bill will lift outdated policies and restrict american access to russian markets. as a result studies show u.s. producers can expect to achieve double-digit increases over the next decade in exports of heavy machinery, agricultural machinery, chemicals, and services. this is particularly critical for my home state of illinois where we have fallen behind japan and korea in these export categories. most importantly, granting russia permanent normal trade relations gives the u.s. a level playing field on which we can compete from a position of strength in thames of intellectual property and agricultural exports. it will provide a reliable forum for trade dispute resolution. and i would urge my colleagues to vote for the rule and the bill to grow american exports and create good jobs here in the united states by suppo
back to that expert, mark twain. he says about music what i would say about the u.s.-china relationship. --said about wagner's music he was a great music critic. britney spears'spair not asand said, "it's good as it looks." [laughter] >> thank you. >> let me pick up on a point he made earlier. it is a complex idea. a great challenge that we face and might face is managing this relationship. in this context, i want to stress what i see as two of the major issues of challenge. first, the internal challenge. we tend to assume that china is growing at an% a year -- 10% per year, but i think that is wrong. i think we will see a combination of economic and internal political reasons. china is entering, my guess is a very difficult period. the society has outgrown the political system that brought the revolution. we have seen decided grow in the way it has. it has substantial measure because of its economic growth. i like to do this when i give talks about china. this is one of the most revolutionary technologies of any kind -- cell phone. it is relevant because there are millions of cell phon
need to rethink this and it is hard to amend the u.s. constitution and the electoral college is in the u.s. constitution but there may be some things that can be done short of amending the constitution that can change that. we may have that result again. we have had it in the past. it will be interesting to see what the public reaction would be if you have a split decision here. that does not have to happen but it could. >> maybe you can give us your prediction as to the winner of the popular vote and by how much and then some of the key states. it can also mention colorado and wisconsin. where are the state going to go? >> i think if obama gets 310 electoral votes, it will not be that close in the electoral college. he does when ohio and he wins wisconsin. i do not know about virginia, colorado. i was in colorado this weekend, i have grandchildren in colorado. virginia is very close in the presidential race. i think obama wynns enough so he could crack 300 electoral votes. >> for jenna is close. one thing you got to remember last time is there was a huge margin for obama. ev
five weeks. the u.s. supreme court has spoken. let there be no doubt. while i strongly disagree with the court's decision, i except at -- except it. i accept the finality of this outcome which will be ratified in the electoral college. for the sake of unity, i offer my concession. i also accept my responsibility which i will discharge unconditionally to honor the new president-elect and do everything possible to help him bring americans together in fulfillment of the great vision that our declaration of independence defiance and that our constitution affirms and fans. let me say how grateful i am to all those who supported me and supported the cause for which we have fought. we feel a deep gratitude to joe lieberman who brought passion and high purpose to our partnership and open new doors not just for our campaign but our country. this has been an extraordinary election. in one of god's unforeseen pals, this belated broken impasse can point asselta and new common ground for its closeness can serve to remind us that we're when people with a shared history and a shared destiny. t
policy. c-span 3 a look at the u.s. pretences them and budgetary concerns. all of these that it o'clock eastern on the c-span networks. here on c-span, a program from "atlantic" magazine. and reached water talks about her cover story on the topic. that is that 9:00 eastern. -- at 9:35 eastern. >> go and find your soldiers and the labor market. the villages and towns of america. we did that. over five or six years we created an absolutely splendid force of young men and women willing to serve their country as volunteers. they had the same tradition, the same culture, loyalty and dedication of any other generation of americans that have ever gone before. they proved themselves in the gulf war, panama invasion, and iraq st 10 years anin and get a stand. we it to keep in mind is something prado begin said -- president lincoln said. it means never forget they are carrying the american spirit, the american traditions with them. when they get injured, when they get hurt, or when they come back to be reintegrated into society, we need to be waiting to care for them. not just the federal g
. measures of the condition of u.s. financial markets and institutions suggest gradual but significant progress achieved since the crisis. for example, credit spreads on corporate bonds and syndicated loans have narrowed considerably, and equity prices have recovered most of their losses. in addition, indicators of market stress and illiquidity, such as short-term funding markets, have generally returned to levels near the scene before the crisis. one gauge of the overall improvement of financial markets is the national financial conditions index, maintained by the fed reserve bank of chicago. this index shows that financial conditions viewed as a whole are now about as accommodative as they were in the spring of 2007. in spite of this brought improvement, the harm inflicted by the financial crisis has yet to be fully repaired important segments of the financial sector. one example is the continued weakness of some categories of bank lending. banks' capital positions and overall asset quality have improved substantially over the past several years, and overtime the balance sheet improv
in the u.s. given the array of reforms that are corte each country's future. you need to take that complexity into account and you anticipate what is going to occur there. in china this requires changes in the development model that china is pursuing and basically changes from the former model to the least what they have anticipated in -- what they stipulated in the five-year plan. something closer to what is in the world bank report that came out last spring. these are very complicated and wide ranging changes. there are deeply rooted vested interests that will oppose parts of the 12 fighter plan and these are powerful interests. local, territorial, and -- political leaders. this is in part because they benefit from the current development model. they have a lot of power within their bailiwicks and a lot of flexibility. it is in part i have been startled as i get into this issue more. many of these positions are bottom sold. this is not necessarily a meritocracy move. people did not handle themselves effectively. with five level political systems, in the thousand of these 40,
. this is the number one thing thousands of business people said was the biggest barrier to investing in the u.s. we have got to upgrade our infrastructure, but we have got to focus on those that are economically important. we have got to understand the things that are driving up the cost of doing business. we know what those are, but we need a plan for going forward we need to create a framework for rapidly developing and the windfall. we have a path to energy independence. that is a bridge to renewable energy. if we can move to dass, we get tremendous benefits -- if we can move to gas, we can get tremendous and benefits. we have not been able to act on these things. >> let me jump to doug and steve and try to poke holes in this in a second. if we roll back time to just before the financial crisis, doug was out there bitching about already, but it is much worse. we are back to 156% of gdp. you are still in crisis mode. you have a private sector and events that led to a government response and a worsening of debt issues, so my question is why is it never on this list to get the private sector in con
after that, the weekend after -- of november 13. u.s. employers have added 170 -- 171,000 jobs in october according to the labor department. hiring was stronger over the previous two months than first thought. the unemployment rate inched up from 7.8% to 7.9%. the economy added an average of 173,000 jobs per month since july. mitt romney issued a statement that said the unemployment rate is a sad reminder the economy is a virtual standstill for the jobless rate is higher than it was when president obama took office. we will hilton -- we will hear more about the unemployment number from both campaigns today. they are on the campaign trail with four days to go into the elections. president obama has three stops in ohio. coming up in about 15 minutes here on c-span, we will take you to the first stop of the day in hilltard outside columbus. the first lady michelle obama is campaigning in virginia today. at 5:30 eastern, we will take you to petersburg where she will be speaking with supporters. tonight on c-span, mitt romney and paul brian will be joined by their wives for a rally
. >> jeff gardner is president and ceo of the windstream corporation and chairman of the u.s. telecom trade association. he has been our guest on "the communicators." gentleman, thank you. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> 2013 should be the year we begin to solve entitlement reform. i am proposing we avert the fiscal cliff together in a manner that ensures 2013 is finally the year that our government comes to grips with the major problems that are facing us. >> i am open to compromise. i am open to new ideas. i am committed to solving our fiscal challenge. but i refuse to accept any approach that is not balanced. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle-class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me, making over $250,000, are not asked to pay more in taxes. >> congress starts work in january but the current congress has work to do through the end of the year referred to as a lame duck session. work is expected on the impending fiscal cliff, including the expiration of the bush
. the u.s. chamber of commerce won only one race. even with all that money, it did not affect the races. they were prepared. they had their own super pacs and outside groups. they were able to win those races. >> i am going to turn it over to jim, who served in the reagan ministration and the push to administration. he is also a regular on fox news. what do you think happened last night and what does it mean for america? >> thank you and i apologize for being late. i was late for reasons i will get into in a moment. i worked in a political affairs office way back in the stone age so i can never resist crunching the numbers. there are two ways of interpreting, if you will, how mitt romney did versus president obama. on the one hand, it is extremely hard to defeat an elected incumbent president. since 1900, at 10 of 14 elected incumbent presidents were reelected. now it is 11 out of 15. it is a daunting challenge. the white house tends to turn over when there is an open seat, as it were. only once since 1986 has a president and a party lost the white house after only four years. that was
with how the u.s. in cages in these transitions at the end of 2013? >> by the end of 2013, we will all be saying, yes, security sector reforms in these countries is important. we will be saying this because we have gone through a year of rocky times in which there is a test of strength taking place between the forces that are in each of these societies that are now beginning to emerge. when the four of us were traveling together a couple times in the spring, i think we all came back overly optimistic about the potential. we were so struck by the talent and spirit of the people and the available resources. i think we overlooked the fact -- the fact that the argument is not over. the argument is being formed. i think it will get a little bit worse before it gets better. we may be in a process where we have in place legitimate authority were we can go to, and say, now it is time to reform. they will say, yes it is, we have legitimacy to do this, and let me tell you what we want to do first. >> i think that was a hopeful sign up -- helpful set of concluding comments. thank you for joining
a local appellate court, and while we are the last u.s. territory to do so, it is more than fitting that we are on the verge of accomplishing the final goal of making the u.s. virgin islands supreme court just like all other state supreme courts, an i urge my colleagues to vote in favor of h.r. 6116. . the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady yields back. the gentleman from virginia is recognized. mr. scott: i yield to the gentleman from american samoa. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlelady is recognized. mr. faleomavaega: mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent to extend and revise and extend my remarks. i thank the gentleman from virginia and especially my dear friend and colleague, the gentleman from north carolina, as managers of this important legislation. mr. speaker, i rise today in strong support of h.r. 6116, a bill to provide for appeals from the virgin islands supreme court to go to the u.s. supreme court instead of the third circuit court of appeals. h.r. 6116 sponsored by my good friend and gentlelady from the virgin islands simply puts into legislation a decision vetted
the state of the u.s. postal service. alan ota is the senior writer with cq roll call. republican caller, you are on the air. we are listening. caller: i am calling about the hours. they are open from 9:00 until 4:00 for the weekend on saturday three hours. they do not cater to the customer. that would be the first place to start. that's it. guest: they are talking about may be adjusting the hours. on saturday, they are talking perhaps about maybe not having any deliveries are handling of letters but they would have a package services so that maybe they might be able to have longer hours for doing the packages on saturday but not dealing with letters. they are trying to find a way to tailor their services and focus on things that are really bringing in money like these package deliveries. host: nebraska, independent caller -- caller: i've got a couple of comments -- the postal employee that called in was all right on where he talked about the amount of money that the postal service has to put into opm and no other federal agency does it and no other federal agency tries to pay its way li
this in the u.s.. it will take working together with policy makers, with academics, with folks in the technology in st. -- technology industry. there are some wonderful things that can happen going forward if we fill the gap in this country. i ask you on your way out to pick up "education, jobs and the american dream. " we went coast-to-coast and did interviews with ceo's and it gives you a good idea what they're feeling. how the will power their own growth going forward. and maybe some sense into why they need to get talent outside of the u.s. i hope you enjoy the session today with ron brownstein. and i think you again for allowing us to participate. i turn this over to you. thanks. [applause] >> the oakhollow group has been a terrific partner with us -- the apollo group has been a terrific partner with us. i would welcome our panelists on stage and you'll get the really good sense for the two panels that we have a will be looking at by the numbers, the 2012 recap. immediately after, we will have a second conversation on the economy and the election. serving as moderator is ronald brownstein,
"washington journal," tom shoop discusses the sequestration. ta on theall alan od u.s. postal service. and look at consumer confidence, with washington post financial reporter dan neal douglas. your phone calls, females, and tweets. "washington journal" live friday mroning on c-span. >> the name of this place still rests -- resonates with the shuttering of the american people. more than any other name connected to the civil war except lincoln's, a gettysburg reverberates. americans retain knowledge that what happened here was the crux of our terrible national trial. even americans who were not sure precisely what happened on these fields know that all the glory and all the tragedy we associate with the civil war besides most probably, most indelibly here. >> denied o'clock eastern, lincoln director steven spielberg -- at 8:00 eastern, "lincoln" director, steven spielberg. >> now we bring you a discussion about gaming and solving the world's problems through an alternate realities. analysts talk about the effect of gaming on health, education, and social issues, as well as the future o
facing the u.s. government work force. university of georgia professor hal rainey recently spoke to students at the university of missouri school of public affairs. his speech is one hour and 10 minutes. ?wçññ >> good afternoon. good afternoon, dean of the truman school of public affairs here at the university of missouri. it is my pleasure to welcome you to the monroe -- monroe-paine distinguished lecture series. our speaker today it is professor hal rainey, the alumni distinguished prof. of public administration at the diversity of georgia. as i said to a group earlier this morning, he is a longtime friend and colleague of mine. we taught statistics back before pi was squared. [laughter] his lecture to they will talk about the issues we confront in the public service, challenges, opportunities, as well as some of the threats facing the public service. please join me in welcoming professor hal rainey. [applause] >> thank you. i am enthusiastic about being here, a great honor and pleasure to be here at the internationally respected truman school and to mee
down main street, u.s.a. is short. those individuals are the ones we need to capture and utilize a new ideas andtri-care in contracting out mental health care when appropriate. of these are the themes we need to look at. i think the tri-care discussion is part of a larger equation of how can we develop as many options as possible to reach these returning veterans who have these very dire mental health care needs? va does take a long time to and utilize new employees. this is an area we need to concentrate on. the american legion is talking to you and your staff to better understand those options. we have an obligation to realize how much that try care opportunity will help the situation. we can reduce the mental health care access and reduce the combat troops coming back. >> thank you. >> do not get too comfortable with the gavel here. thank you very much, mr. chairman. i would like to access the same line of thinking. when you look at a state like maine, a very rural state, access is an important issue. when you look at what we're seeing in the military today with the increase in suic
of the national senatorial committee made a statement this morning regarding last night. u.s. senator john cornyn tonight made the following statement. here is the "new york times" and how they played last night's election. here is the, "wall street journal." the "washington times." andy "washington post" -- and the "washington post." cynthia on the democrat's line, good morning. caller: my view is how to do with the racism. there is a much divisiveness in terms of the racism. in order for both parties to move ahead, i think that's something needs to be done there. there is racism, and the other topic was how women were huge, especially by the republicans. women are people prepared -- our people. god gave us all the power to think on our own and there is nowhere that he says women cannot make choices. and men, especially on the republican side, are going to have to realize that women should be able to say what we allow with our bodies and not allow. host: can you give us an example of what you mean by racism in yesterday's election? caller: racism in terms of black and white, hispanic -- host: yo
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 67